Facebook YouTube Twitter Pinterest Instagram Blogger Ebay Store
  (516) 520 5252
 
 
   

Archive for the ‘Birthstones’ Category

Top Six Steps to Picking the Perfect Engagement Ring

Selecting an engagement ring for your future spouse can be one of the most daunting tasks a romantic can undertake. You’ve found the “one” to be your life partner and want to find the “perfect” ring he or she will love and want to show off to friends and family.

There are many choices, but fear not, we’ve put together six steps to finding the perfect engagement ring for your future spouse, courtesy of the GIA.

  1. Make it a surprise. While the trend of couples shopping together for an engagement ring is on the rise, we suggest you try to figure out what he or she will like on your own. Yes, it will take some detective work, but if you get it right, the reward will pay dividends. There are few opportunities for a really big surprise in life—let your engagement ring be one of them.
  2. Decide on and stick to your budget. Like any major purchase, decide on what you can comfortably afford, and stick to it. Then do your due diligence so you can save money. Spending more than you have to won’t make the ring any nicer than it is. In fact, getting a good deal may endear you even more to your future spouse. Rather than expensive retail jewelry stores in malls (remember, you’re paying higher mark ups), consider visiting a high-end pawn shop like Empire Jewelers for beautiful and unique pieces at a fraction of the cost.
  3. Pay attention to what they wear. You could ask one of their close friends for advice on the kind of ring he or she would like, but you run the risk of them talking and ruining the surprise. We suggest putting on your detective hat and paying attention to what your SO is wearing from day to day.Are the rings and other pieces classic and traditional or funky and modern? Are they full of bling or more subdued? If you buy something similar to what he or she already likes, you’ll probably choose the right one.
  4. Know their ring size. This is an important one, because you’ll want to know the ring will fit when you present it. If he or she wears rings, borrow one they already own. Trace the inner circle on a piece of paper, or press the ring into a bar of soap for an impression. You can also slide it down one of your own fingers and draw a line where it stops. A jeweler can use these measurements to identify his or her approximate ring size.
  5. Know what diamond shape suits him or her. After determining the style and ring size, you’ll need to pick a design. As your future spouse will be wearing this ring every day during his or her engagement and into your married life, it really needs to fit their personality. To help you decide, here are some popular engagement ring designs to consider for him or her:
  • Engagement ring designs for women:
  • Solitaire – Featuring a single stone, this is the most popular choice in engagement rings. Solitaires can be set with four prongs or six prongs. A four-prong-setting shows more of the diamond, but a six-prong setting is often more secure.
  • Side stones – Diamonds or other gemstones, flank the main stone for additional sparkle or color. Popular side-stone settings include ”channel,” which protects stones by keeping them flush, and ”bar channel” which allows more light to enter the sides tones.
  • Three Stone – One diamond for the past, one for the present, and one for the future. Typically, the center diamond is larger than the two side stones.
  • Pavé (pah-vey) – The main stone is surrounded by tiny diamonds to add sparkle and the illusion of greater size.
  • Engagement ring designs for men:
  • In addition to traditional gold and platinum, men’s engagement and wedding rings come in an array of unique, modern metals. Select from titanium, zirconium, tungsten carbide, and steel. Even natural materials, such as wood are becoming increasingly popular. Men may also choose a ring that’s accented with stones such as black diamonds for added brilliance and intrigue. Plain bands featuring textural elements such as a woven or hammered design are also quite popular.

6. Create an experience. Once you’ve made the effort and decided on the ring you think your loved one will truly cherish, create a proposal experience that’s unique to your relationship. Whether together you enjoy sports, horseback riding, taking in shows or have a favorite romantic hiking spot, create one of the fondest experiences you can and make a memory to last your lifetime together.

If you’re looking for a fine diamond engagement ring, make sure to visit Empire’s eBay store for an incredible selection of hundreds of high-quality new and estate diamond rings at up to 70 percent off what you would pay at retail.

Source: GIA

Learn About Aquamarine, the March Birthstone

Happy birthday March babies! Your official birthstone is not only beautiful, it’s full of history and mythology. Here are some interesting facts about your birthstone, the aquamarine.

Diamond aquamarine halo estate ring 18K YG rectangle baguette round brill 21.9CT click here
  • In addition to being the birthstone for March and the zodiac sign of Pisces, aquamarine is also the gemstone used to celebrate a 19th wedding anniversary.
  • The aquamarine is a transparent pale blue variety of beryl (beryllium aluminum silicate) — the same mineral family that emeralds belong to.
  • Like many beryls, aquamarine forms large crystals suitable for sizable fashioned gems and carvings.
  • The word aquamarine is derived from the Latin phrase “aqua marinus,” meaning “water of the sea” because they are said to resemble the beautiful blue-green color of ocean water.
  • Aquamarines were said to calm waves and keep sailors safe at sea. Sailors were known to wear aquamarine talismans engraved with the likeness of Neptune, as protection against dangers at sea.
  • March’s birthstone was also thought to enhance the happiness of marriages.
  • Aquamarines come in a wide range of shades and colors, from pale pastel to sky blue and blue-green to sea-green. The rarest and most valuable aquamarines are those with a deep blue color.
  • The best gems combine high clarity with transparency and blue to slightly greenish blue hues.
  • The color of aquamarine is due to trace amounts of iron that works its way inside the crystal. Most commercially-sold aquamarines are heat-treated to produce a more desirable blue-green color.
  • Aquamarines have a hexagonal-shaped crystal system. They are pleochroic in nature, meaning they can show three colors, depending on the angle they’re viewed.
  • Like many gems, aquamarines are thought by some to have metaphysical powers, including the ability to clear and cleanse, refresh and uplift. Some say they also promote courage, calm, compassion, tolerance, love, communication, self-expression, reasoning, intellect and connection to one’s higher self.
  • Aquamarines are also said to aid in the healing of sore throats and swollen glands, and in calming nerves, improving vision, and cooling sunburns and fevers.
  • The ancient Romans believed that Neptune, the god of the sea, obtained aquamarines from the jewel boxes of the Sirens. Legend has it that Neptune gave aquamarines as a gift to the mermaids.
  • Because of their bond with the sea, aquamarine is the gemstone of several sea goddesses, including Aphrodite, the Greek goddess of love. Aphrodite was also widely worshipped as a goddess of the sea and of seafaring.
  • Aquamarines are mined in exotic locations including Nigeria, Madagascar, Zambia, Pakistan and Mozambique, but most modern aquamarines come from Brazil.
  • One of the largest aquamarines ever mined weighed 110.5 kg. It was found in 1910 in Marambaia/Minas Gerais, Brazil.
  • In the United States, the only location where you can mine for aquamarines is Mount Antero in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado. The elusive gem is said to be found at altitudes of 14,000 feet or more.

If you’re looking for an aquamarine for a March birthday gift, or any other fine birthstone gift, visit Empire’s eBay store for wholesale prices and an above-your-expectations buying experience.

Learn About Calming Amethyst

Amethyst, the birthstone for Pisces and the month of February, is said to have calming qualities

• In addition to being the official birthstone for February, amethyst is also the gemstone for the 6th and 17th wedding anniversaries.

• Amethyst is the purple variety of quartz, occurring naturally as crystals within rocks.

• Amethyst is the most valued member of the quartz family, considered a semiprecious gem for its violet color.

• A quartz must be purple to be amethyst, but can range in shade from light lilac to deep purple.

• Heating amethyst removes the color or changes it to the yellow of citrine. Today, most citrine is made in this manner.

• The word amethyst comes from the Greek word “amethystos,” meaning sober.

• Throughout history, amethyst has been used to protect against drunkenness and to help overcome addiction. Today, amethyst is considered to be a symbol of calm and tranquility, and a stabilizing force for those struggling to overcome addictive behaviors.

• The astrologer Camillo Leonardi wrote that amethyst quickens intelligence and gets rid of evil thoughts.

• A gift of amethyst is a symbol of protection, said to strengthen the bonds of love and overcome difficulty.

• Amethyst was associated with Dionysus, the Greek god of wine. In ancient Greece, people believed wine served in amethyst goblets would protect against drunkenness.

• According to Greek mythology, Amethyst was a young virgin who angered the Greek god, Dionysus, after he became drunk from red wine. When Amethyst called the goddess Diana for help, Diana turned Amethyst into a white quartz. When Dionysus felt remorse, he cried, dripping his tears into his goblet of red wine. When the goblet overturned, the red wine spilled on the white quartz, coloring it purple—the color of amethyst.

• Amethysts were once considered more valuable than diamonds, until deposits were found, increasing the quantity and lowering the value.

• Amethyst deposits have been found in Brazil, Canada, Australia, India, Madagascar, Namibia, Russia, Sri Lanka and in the United States. Today, most amethyst comes from Brazil and Uruguay.

• Amethyst is the official state gemstone of South Carolina, after world-class amethysts were found at the Ellis-Jones Mine near Due West, SC on June 24, 1969. The South Carolina amethysts are presently on display at the American Museum of Natural History and the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History.

• In August 2011, the world’s largest amethyst, called the “Empress of Uruguay,” was vandalized by a tourist while the 2.5-ton geode was on display in Queensland, Australia.

• Known as “the royal beauty,” amethyst has been associated with royalty throughout the ages, in part because of its royal purple color. A large amethyst is among the closely-guarded gemstones in the British Crown Jewels, and it is said that amethyst was a favorite of Queen Catherine the Great of Russia.

• Amethyst also has much religious history and symbolism. In the Bible, it was one of the 12 stones that adorned the high priest Aaron’s breastplate in Exodus 39. As a symbol of spirituality and piety, amethyst has also been used to decorate churches and crosses, and worn in rings and on rosaries by religious clergy.

If you’re looking for a calming amethyst, visit Adina by Empire Jewelers eBay store. You’ll fine exquisite fine jewelry, at wholesale prices.

Interesting Facts about the Ruby, July’s Birthstone

Interesting Facts about the Ruby, July's Birthstone

Interesting Facts about the Ruby, July’s Birthstone

Happy Birthday, July babies! To celebrate your summer birthstone, we’re paying tribute to the romantic and luxurious ruby. Read on for fun and interesting facts about rubies:

  • Ruby is the birthstone for July, as well as the astrological sign of Capricorn.
  • Ruby is one of the four precious gemstones; the others are emerald, sapphire and diamond.
  • Ruby is the red gem form of the mineral corundum, which has an absolute hardness of 400 (compared to diamonds which have an absolute hardness of 1600).
  • Trace amounts of the element chromium is what gives rubies their red appearance.
  • Blue corundum gems are called sapphires.
  • Rubies in shades of pink are simply referred to as pink rubies.
  • The finest rubies in the world were once found in Burma in South and Southeast Asia. Today, Burma is known as Myanmar.
  • Flawless top-quality rubies are more valuable and rare than top quality colorless diamonds.
  • The Sanskrit word for ruby is “ratnaraj” which roughly translates to “king of the gems.”
  • The color of the pure red rubies from the mines of Mogok was sometimes referred to as “pigeon’s blood.”
  • The most expensive ruby ever sold was a 25.59 carat cushion-shaped ruby ring set between shield-shaped diamonds. It sold in 2015 at a Sotheby’s auction in Geneva for a reported $30.3 million.
  • The American Museum of Natural History has the largest ruby in the world, which weighs around 4.6 grams.
  • In ancient times, rubies were thought to give its wearer good health, wisdom, wealth, and success in love.
  • The word red is derived from the Latin word, ruber.
  • Almost all natural rubies are treated to improve their color and strength; this is standard practice and accepted by the American Gem Trade Association and Israel-Diamonds.
  • At the end of The Wizard of Oz, Glinda the Good Witch of the North tells Dorothy she can return home to Kansas by clicking the heels of her magical ruby red slippers together three times and repeating the phrase, “There’s no place like home.”
  • Theodore Maiman invented the world’s first laser, known as the “ruby laser” in 1960. This first generation laser was a solid-state type using a ruby crystal.
  • Rubies are referenced four different times in the Bible—the Bible associates these gems with beauty and wisdom.
  • According to ancient folklore, people of India believed rubies would help them be at peace with their enemies.
  • High ranking Chinese mandarins were given rubies, as they were thought to provide guidance and teaching.
  • In ancient times, ruby stones were kept under a building foundation, to strengthen its structure.

If you’re looking to buy rubies, either as a birthday gift for a loved one born in July, or just because you’re drawn to the lovely red gemstone of the month, Adina by Empire Jewelers has a beautiful collection of fine estate and vintage ruby jewelry, available at true wholesale prices. Shop online today and enjoy our vast selection of other fine estate and vintage jewelry, plus watches, diamonds, gold, sterling silver, coins and more. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact us.

Fun and Interesting Facts About Diamonds

Diamond FactsIf you’re lucky enough to have been born in April, you get to claim the diamond as your birthstone. Whether you have an April birthday or not, this glamorous gemstone is a favorite of many. Test your knowledge of diamonds, the official birthstone of April. Scroll down for the answers — but no cheating!

  1. Diamonds are a naturally occurring allotrope of what element?
  2. Diamonds are formed deep inside the Earth’s interior when carbon is crystallized over a long period of time. What two factors cause the crystallization?
  3. Diamonds are appraised and priced according to the 4Cs: color, clarity, carat weight and cut. What organization created this standard grading system?
  4. Diamonds were first mined in India around 800 BC. Today, what are the four top diamond producing countries in the world?
  5. A state park in Arkansas is the only diamond-producing location in the world that allows the public to dig for and keep the diamonds they find. What is the name of the state park?
  6. Marilyn Monroe famously sang “Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend” in what 1953 film?
  7. In the 1963 film, The Pink Panther, Peter Sellers played clueless police inspector Jacques Clouseau on the trail of a jewel thief known as “The Phantom.” In the movie, what is the name of “the largest diamond in the world?”
  8. In December 2011, Elizabeth Taylor’s renowned jewelry collection was auctioned at Christie’s in New York. One of her most famous pieces was the Taylor-Burton diamond ring, given to her by husband, Richard Burton. How many carats is it, and what is its estimated worth?
  9. In James Cameron’s movie Titanic starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet, what is the name of the fictional blue diamond lost to the ocean?
  10. On December 10, 2012 at the final lot of Christie’s “Magnificent Jewels” auction, a new world auction record was achieved for a reddish-orange fancy colored diamond. What was the diamond’s carat weight, and what did it sell for?

Diamond Quiz Answers:

  1. Carbon
  2. Heat and pressure
  3. The 4Cs grading system was created by the Gemological Institute of America (GIA)
  4. Australia, Zaire, Botswana, and the former Soviet Union
  5. Crater of Diamonds State Park
  6. Gentlemen Prefer Blondes
  7. The Pink Panther
  8. The Taylor-Burton diamond is a 69.42 carat pear-shaped stone estimated to be worth $3.5 million. Taylor sold the diamond in 1978 following her divorce from Burton to fund her charity work.
  9. “The Heart of the Ocean”
  10. The rare 3.15 carat diamond is the largest reddish-orange diamond ever graded at the Gemological Institute of America (GIA), and sold for $2,098,500, setting a new world auction record for a reddish-orange diamond and a new per-carat record price of $666,200.

Celebrate Autumn with Gemstones in the Colors of Fall

This month we present you with information about the warm and inviting gemstones of the fall. This season evokes the beautiful colors of the falling leaves. The beautiful oranges, burgundies, and yellows conjure up many feelings and memories of fall leaves, sunsets over the mountains, pumpkins and cornucopias. In celebration of autumn, we take a moment to appreciate some fall-hued gemstones, courtesy of the experts at the Gemological Institute of America (GIA).

Citrine

Citrines are a variety of the mineral quartz crystals commonly found in igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks. Citrines are commonly found in shades of yellow, but they can appear in an orange shade called Madeira.

Citrine is the gemstone for the zodiac sign of Scorpio, and the gemstone given for the 13th and 17th wedding anniversaries. In ancient times, citrine was worn as protection against bad skin, evil thoughts, snakebites and even the plague. Mined mainly in Brazil, citrine is often found in larger sizes, due to its affordable price, and it is easy to find.

Fancy sapphire

Fancy sapphires are a variety of the mineral corundum, and come in orange, as well as other colors. An especially alluring orange-pink color is called padparadscha, after the lotus blossom. According to GIA gem experts, padparadscha are very rare and range from pastels to more fiery shades of orange.

The finest authentic padparadscha sapphires are usually very expensive, on par with their blue counterparts. Sri Lanka and East Africa are two major sources of orange and padparadscha sapphires.

Fire opal

Fire opals are known as an anomaly in the gem world. Mined in Australia, opals are usually smoothly polished in a cabochon (domed) shape and are opaque (not see-through). But the fire opal is often found in a fantastic orange color, cut in a faceted manner, and is mostly transparent in better quality facet-grades.

Spessartine garnet

Spessartine garnet is one of the most appealing of all the orange-hued gemstones. According to GIA’s colored stone experts, it is prized for its bright orange-yellow to yellowish-orange color, with some of the best — and most sought after — examples mined in Southern California, at the Little Three mine, near Ramona. High-quality spessartine has more recently been mined in Namibia and Nigeria.

Mandarin garnet

Mandarin garnet is also known as bright orange spessartine. Found in Namibia in Southern Africa, the rich color of the Mandarin garnet makes it a popular choice with orange gemstone lovers. Although relatively inexpensive in small sizes, larger stones—which rarely exceed 10 carats — can be very expensive.

Topaz

Topaz gems are another gemstone found in various colors, including yellow, dark blue, pink, red, and light green, but they truly glow in orange. Fine orange and “imperial topaz” (orange with a hint of red) are among the rarer colors of topaz, and their higher prices reflect their scarcity. This unusual shade is mostly found in Brazil.

Whatever type of gemstone you prefer, keep in mind that there’s no right or wrong when choosing. The important thing is to do your research on the particular gemstone that you like, and look for a jeweler. Make sure the appraiser is educated by the GIA (Gemological Institute of America), ensuring professional expertise in the valuation of our fine gems and precious metals. Also make sure the pawn shop or jewelry store is a member of the National Pawnbrokers Association.

If you are looking to update your jewelry wardrobe for the season, or to purchase fine jewelry as holiday gifts, you’ll find fine estate, vintage and antique jewelry visit Adina’s eBay store. You’ll discover authentic fine jewelry at true wholesale prices, authentically appraised by GIA-trained experts.

Opals, October’s Birthstone, Origins and Value

October Birthstone: The Opal

October’s birthstone is one of the most interesting gemstones on earth.  In celebration of the magical and mysterious opal, let’s take a look at some fascinating and rare facts about the origin and value of opals.

The first opals are believed to have been found in Ethiopia about 4,000 BC. The ancient Romans called the opal “Cupid Paederos,” which translates to “a child beautiful as love.” The ancient Romans would grind up and consume opals because they believed they had healing properties and the power to ward off bad dreams.

The term opal is derived from the Sanskrit term “upala,” which means precious or valuable stone and the root for the Greek term “opallios,” which translates to “color change.” Opals are created from an ancient mineral known as petrified silica gel that is found near the earth’s surface where geothermal hot springs once existed.

Today, about 97 percent of the world’s opals come from Australia. The first Australian discovery of common opals was made in 1849 near Angaston, South Australia by a German immigrant named Johannes Menge. The indigenous people of Australia call the opal “the fire in the desert.” Most of the world’s supply of precious opals comes from the Coober Pedy and Andamooka fields in South Australia. Coober Pedy is known as “The Opal Capital of the World” because 51 percent of the world’s supply of opals is mined there.

Opals may come from other planets as well. In 2011, scientists discovered opal-like crystals in the Tagish Lake meteorite, which fell to Earth in Canada in 2000. According to a report in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, this was the first extra-terrestrial discovery of these unusual crystals. Some scientists hypothesize that they may have formed in the primordial cloud of dust that produced the sun and planets of our solar system 4.6 billion years ago.

The classes of opals

All naturally occurring opals fall into one of two classes: precious and common. Precious opals are those that display flashes of iridescent colors when turned and tilted, and light strikes its surface at various angles. This effect is called “play of color,” but is scientifically referred to as opalescence.

Play of color, or opalescence, is caused by tiny sphere formations of silicon which make up the structure of opal. When light is refracted by the spheres, it causes light to be separated into its various spectral colors. The actual colors being emitted are controlled by the size and distance of the spheres to each other.

While opals come in many diverse colors and combinations, precious black opals are the most valuable and in demand because of their rarity and play of color. Precious opals also come in white, gray, red, orange, yellow, green, blue, magenta, rose, pink, slate, olive, and brown. Reds against black are most rare, while white and greens are the most common.

Any opal that does not exhibit “play of color” is classified as a common opal. Common opals are classified as non-gem quality opals. There are several varieties of common opal and most are opaque. Common opals, sometimes called “potch,” are usually colorless or white, but may also come in gray, brown, yellow, or red.

If you’re looking for opal jewelry but don’t want to pay retail prices, visit Adina’s eBay store where you can rely on the jewelry experts at Adina Jewelers. You’ll find fine a vast selection of beautiful opal and other gemstone jewelry and get a buying experience that’s above your expectations.

Princess Diana’s Influence on Jewelry Style

It has been 20 years since the passing of Princess Diana, and her legacy is remembered by the world as strongly today as it was two decades ago. Kept forever in our hearts for her humanitarian efforts and grace, her style was also influential in fashion as well as jewelry.

Case in point was the unusual choice of her engagement ring. In 1981, Princess Diana chose the ring for her engagement to Prince Charles. She was criticized at the time for choosing a ring that “anyone could buy” instead of having one custom made. But Lady Di had an eye for style, and replicas of the ring were quickly in demand, as they are again today. The royal ring was originally purchased in 1981 from the catalog of the historic British jeweler, Garrard, for 28,000 British pounds ($65,000 USD). Today, the ring is said to be worth about half a million dollars, with the sapphire alone worth $300,000. Princess Diana liked the ring so much that she even wore it after her divorce from Charles.

Upon Diana’s death, both of her sons chose a keepsake of hers — Prince Harry chose his mother’s engagement ring, while Prince William chose his mother’s gold Cartier watch. But the two brothers had an agreement that whoever became engaged first would present the ring to their betrothed. Prince William romantically proposed to his sweetheart of over eight years, Kate Middleton, while they were on vacation in 2010 in Kenya. Prince William proposed to Middleton with the famous sapphire and diamond ring, stating later he used his mother’s engagement ring as a “way of making sure my mother didn’t miss out on today and the excitement.”

Diamonds and Sapphires

The royal engagement ring is a deep blue oval sapphire — estimated at 12 carats — encircled by 14 round diamonds set in 18K white gold. After her engagement, Middleton had the engagement ring resized by the royal jewelers G. Collins & Sons to fit her finger better. She asked them to attach small platinum beads inside the bottom of the ring to make it smaller. When Middleton first showed the ring in public at St. James’s Palace in London, she wore a royal blue dress by Issa that accentuated the blue of the sapphire.

Royal Replicas In Demand

Soon after Kate Middleton first appeared wearing the royal ring, demand for replicas skyrocketed around the globe as it did when Diana first appeared wearing it. The National Sapphire Company’s website actually crashed from demand-related traffic and jewelers around the world worked overtime to respond to the demand.

Interested in a sapphire engagement ring? Browse Adina Jewelers eBay for a beautiful selection fine sapphire jewelry, at true wholesale prices.

Healing Properties of Popular Gemstones

Healing Properties of Popular Gemstones

For centuries, people have believed in the healing qualities of crystals and gemstones; not surprisingly, as they are among the oldest natural objects on earth. Here’s a quick guide on the healing qualities of 10 popular gemstones.

Whether or not you believe in their magical powers, gems are beautiful items with significant meanings. Here’s a quick guide to the healing qualities of 10 popular gemstones, courtesy of eluxemagazine.com.

Where crystals come from

Healing stones, crystals and semi-precious gemstones come from one core source — the Earth. Created from the magma from the Earth’s inner core, these stones have been heated, cooled, and are often amongst the most ancient objects on the planet.

Every stone is made up of tiny crystals which are in constant motion, so they do indeed emit an energy signature or frequency. In addition, their striking colors can influence our moods and emotions, so it makes sense that many people believe in the healing energy of gems.

History of healing

Historically, people have had strong connections to gems for many reasons. Evidence of gemstones used for healing has been found as far back as 4 BC. Ancient civilizations such as the Chinese, Egyptians, Sumerians, Greeks, Romans, and more modern shamans and medicine men have used gemstones for healing in multiple ways — they’ve ground them into powders or elixirs, worn, carried or placed them on the body and in ceremonies or rituals. It’s said that rough gemstones, broken or mined from a rock, are most powerful–some healing therapists believe that these can be placed gently on the body to transmit and focus healing energies.

1. Turquoise: Turquoise can be a very powerful stone for protection. It increases inner calmness and eases depression, fears, exhaustion and anxiety. It is a stone for friendship and love. Turquoise has calming effects when speaking in public. It helps us to express ourselves and aids in creative problem solving. This powerful stone also stimulates our intuition and helps in meditation.

2. Amethyst: Amethyst is a very powerful crystal for calming and stress reduction. It is known to calm and bring clarity to the mind, to relieve stress, sooth sadness, anger and anxiety and balance mood swings. It helps us to focus and stimulates motivation, concentration and memory. Amethyst activates our intuitive and psychic abilities, aids in meditation and is said to attract justice.

3. Blue Topaz: Blue topaz is a strong crystal for healing health problems, and aids digestion, fortifies the nerves, balances emotions and stimulates the metabolism. It is known to combat eating disorders. It is also known to increase the general health around the neck and throat area. Blue topaz releases tension, helping one to relax.

4. Crystal Quartz: Crystal quartz is very powerful for healing, meditation, and spiritual growth. It is harmonizing and balancing, and purifies the spirit, mind, and physical body. It can be utilized to bring light and energy into our spiritual bodies. It enhances mental abilities and can be ‘programmed’ and imprinted with any desired energy or information. Crystal quartz is powerful for protection and amplifies positive energy and thought. Due to its power to open up all chakras, it is a great stone for relaxation and also to be combined with other stones, as it amplifies their powers.

5. Moonstone: Moonstone aids in inner growth, strengthens intuition, and stabilizes emotions. It is known as a stone for new beginnings, success in love and business, and good fortune. It promotes inspiration and protects us, especially those of us who are very sensitive. Moonstone is said to perceive that which IS, making it a very personal stone. It is a great aid for meditation and helping us to understand ourselves. Moonstone also soothes stress and anxiety. This beautiful stone is particularly beneficial for women, especially young women, in helping them connect with their feminine side. Moonstone is also said to have the power of making wishes come true.

6. Onyx: Onyx is an excellent stone for stressful or challenging situations as it gives us strength and support. Its soothing qualities alleviate fear and worries and encourage wise decision-making. Onyx is known to increase happiness, intuition and good fortune. It is known to help us change bad habits and keep emotions under control. Onyx helps us to focus and stay grounded. Onyx is also known to help with skin ailments, infections and inflammations. This stone needs to be cleansed and recharged regularly — wash it in salt water or pass it through incense smoke.

7. Rose Quartz: Widely known as the “love” or “heart” stone, rose quartz encourages unconditional love and opens its wearer to all forms of love: self-love, romantic love, family love, and platonic love. Its heart-opening qualities help soothe the nervous system, decrease stress levels and increase happiness, trust, and harmony. Rose quartz stimulates peace, forgiveness, compassion, kindness, inner peace and tolerance. Furthermore, rose quartz heals and strengthens the physical heart and stimulates the circulatory system, increases fertility and protects against radiation. As an extra bonus, rose quartz is said to reduce wrinkles, and is also known to be a protective stone during pregnancy, protecting from miscarriage.

8. Citrine: Citrine is known as the stone of the mind, stimulating the brain, increasing concentration, strengthening the intellect, and increasing psychic powers. It promotes clarity of thoughts, opens the mind to new thoughts, and brings relief to nightmares. Citrine is believed to invite wealth and prosperity into your life. Due to its qualities that bring abundance, citrine has been called the “Lucky Merchant Stone” and business owners place it into their cash drawer to increase sales. Citrine is also known to be beneficial to the endocrine and digestive system, acting as a cleanser and purifier.

9. Amazonite: Amazonite has an extremely soothing quality that helps calm the brain and the nervous system. It brings balance into our life and gives relief to blockages due to trauma or fear. It stimulates integrity, truth, and honor and is said to balance male and female energies. Amazonite increases confidence and strengthens communication skills, helping us to express ourselves. It is a particularly good stone for writers and artists, looking to increase their creativity and self-expression. It is also a great stone to open our minds and help us see both sides of a problem, hence being a great helper in leadership. Amazonite helps us let go of any greed or selfishness, encouraging patience, compassion, and tolerance.

10. Ruby: Ruby is a symbol of vitality, contentment, energy and zest for life. It is said to encourage passion and self-love. By releasing destructive emotional patterns, it helps us to develop more love for ourselves. Through activating passion and life-force, this gorgeous stone helps us to improve motivation and set goals. Ruby is also known to restore life-force and to aid in cleansing and detoxifying the body, blood and lymph system. It also stimulates the heart and reproductive organs.

Whether gemstones have healing powers or not, if you’re looking for fine gemstone jewelry, look no further than Adina Jeweler’s eBay store. You’ll find a gorgeous range of fine estate, vintage and antique gemstone jewelry at true wholesale prices.

Large Diamonds Unveiling Scientific Discoveries About Earth

In celebration of April’s birthstone, the diamond, we’re sharing an interesting new discovery about diamonds, courtesy of Michelle Graff and nationaljeweler.com.

In February, the Lucapa Diamond Co. in Perth, Western Australia announced that it has discovered the largest recorded diamond ever found in Angola: a 404.2-carat stone that has tested as Type IIa and D color.

The diamond was recovered from Alluvial Mining Block 8 at Angola’s Lulo Mine,  which has produced more than 60 large, special diamonds since they started mining there just last August.

The company reported that the 404.2-carat stone is the 27th largest recorded diamond in the world, and the biggest diamond ever discovered by an Australian mining company. It also is the fourth 100-plus-carat diamond to be recovered from Lulo to date, as well as the 114th largest “special” diamond–meaning it weighs more than 10.8 carats–recovered from the mine.

Of further interest is the scientific work that geologists are doing on the unique properties of large Type IIa diamonds similar to the ones being found at Angola’s Lulo Mine.

Evan Smith, a postdoctoral research fellow at the Gemological Institute of America specializing in diamond geology, and his colleagues are trying to better understand Earth’s mantle, which is beneath tectonic plates and, as such, largely inaccessible for scientific observation.

As you may already know, Type IIa diamonds have very little to no nitrogen, which is what makes white diamonds so exceptionally colorless and fancy color diamonds so vibrant. Large Type IIa diamonds that make headlines also tend to be irregular in shape, rather than the nice, symmetrical octahedrons like so many smaller stones. They often have a surface that’s rounded and somewhat dissolved, “almost like a lollipop after someone’s been after it for a while,” says Smith.

The fact that these big, beautiful diamonds are different has not escaped the attention of earth scientists, who have wondered for years if they form in a different way, in a different part of Earth’s mantle, and thus tell us something different about our planet.

In order to conduct the study, though, Smith and the other researchers could not limit themselves to these kinds of large and exceedingly rare diamonds. Instead, they studied Type IIa diamonds of all sizes that came through the GIA lab, including some that were smaller than a carat.

After examining 52 Type IIa stones (and one Type Iab) of all sizes at the GIA lab, Smith and the other researchers found that in nearly three-quarters of the diamonds (38 out of 53), the inclusions weren’t graphite but metallic, a solidified mixture of iron, nickel, carbon, and sulfur.

This is significant because it changes the way scientists think about how different elements, like carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur, are distributed. It also has broad implications for understanding the behavior of the deep Earth, including the recycling of surface rocks into the convecting mantle.

Smith said this discovery verifies what geologists have been theorizing for 10 or more years: that the Earth’s deeper mantle environment has a “light peppering” (up to 1 percent) of metallic iron.

If you’re looking for a diamond but don’t want to pay retail prices, visit Adina’s Ebay store where you can rely on the diamond experts at Adina Jewelers. You’ll find fine a vast selection of fine certified diamonds and get a buying experience that’s above your expectations.

To read more about this study, read Michelle Graff’s interview with Evan Smith at nationaljeweler.com.

 
 
  eBay Newsletter Sign Up Facebook YouTube Twitter Pinterest Instagram Blogger Ebay Store
Copyright Adina, 2019
Website by falconecreativedesign.com