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Archive for the ‘Engagement Diamond Rings’ Category

Wedding Trends Birthstone Engagement Rings

What do Jackie Kennedy, Princess Diana, Kate Middleton, Penelope Cruz, Halle Berry, Elizabeth Hurley, Jessica Simpson, Olivia Wilde, and Victoria Beckham all have in common? Birthstone engagement rings!

Sapphire and Diamond Engagement Ring

Indeed, the selection of birthstones as the marquee stone in engagement rings is becoming increasingly popular—threatening to usurp diamonds as the crown jewel in modern engagement rings.

Here’s what to know, courtesy of whattowear.com.

Bespoke with birthstones

Birthstones – the gemstones that represent a person’s month of birth – have long been popular. But sales are currently rising as more and more shoppers seek to personalize their purchases, especially with engagement rings.

There has been particularly high demand for birthstone engagement rings, which Etsy recently described as a “breakout wedding trend.” “For generations, the diamond has been the ultimate stone for proposing, but today’s bride wants to express her personal style and choose a ring that reflects her personality,” Dayna Isom Johnson, an Etsy spokeswoman said.

L.A.-based jewelry designer Jennie Kwon explained why the trend is taking off: “We are at a time where people are more and more interested in creating bespoke things—pieces that are made just for them and feel personal because of it,” she said. “The trend of birthstone engagement rings falls in line with this.”

If you’re interested in the trend, Kwon has some expert advice to consider: “The only thing we’d say is to be careful about how your birthstone is set if you’re planning on wearing it daily as many women do,” she said. “For instance, for our softer-stoned girls whose birthstones are emeralds, opals, pearls, or the like, we would suggest having them set in a way where the stone is protected, such as a bezel setting.”

Background on birthstones

The connection between gemstones and the zodiac can be traced to the Jewish historian Titus Flavius Josephus. He described in the first century AD in his writings, Antiquities of the Jews, the bejeweled breastplate worn by Aaron, the first high priest of the Israelites, in the Book of Exodus. The breastplate was adorned with 12 stones, each one engraved with the name of one of the 12 tribes of Israel. Reflecting on the significance of the number 12, Josephus suggested that the stones could represent the 12 signs of the zodiac.

The stones subsequently became associated with the 12 months of the year and were purported to have healing properties and bring good luck. Some affluent individuals might well have owned all 12 and carried with them each day the one that corresponded with the current calendar month.

It was only in 1912 that a standardized list was drawn up detailing exactly which stone was connected with which month. This was produced by the United States’ National Association of Jewelers – possibly in an effort to drive up demand for the jewels that made the cut.

In 1937, the UK’s National Association of Goldsmiths produced its own official list – this is the one most retailers here tend to stick to today, although there have been some recent additions.

Recent additions

In 2002, the American Gem Trade Association (AGTA) introduced tanzanite as an alternative to turquoise for December, to acknowledge its popularity. And the Jewelers of America (JA) trade association approved. “JA sees the addition of tanzanite for December as a way to build business,” it said at the time. “Any step that helps retailers sell more jewelry is a good one.”

The most coveted gemstones are diamonds (April), emeralds (May), rubies (July) and sapphires (September) – jewelers refer to them as “the Big Four,” but relatively few people might be familiar with bloodstone (March) and peridot (August).

In 2016 the JA and AGTA jointly announced the introduction of a new birthstone for August to sit alongside peridot on the US standardized list: spinel.

The stone comes in a variety of hues but red is the most popular color. For centuries, spinel was routinely mistaken for ruby – the Black Prince’s Ruby, which sits at the front of the Imperial State Crown worn by the Queen at the State Opening of Parliament, is in fact, a red spinel.

Although the gem has not been introduced to the UK birthstone list, it’ll almost certainly come to enjoy greater popularity over there too.

Alt versions of birthstones

Another growing trend among consumers is to opt for alternative versions of the gemstones that correspond with their birth date. The shade people typically ascribe to garnets (January) is dark red, but the stones come in an array of colors – black, pink, green, purple – red is just much more abundant. Lily Faber, a gemologist, likens spessartine garnets, which are orange, to “beautiful little sweets.”

One of the most frequently overlooked birthstones is opal (October). There’s a long-standing belief that opal is unlucky, and only people whose birthdays fall in October can get away with wearing it. Faber is particularly enamored by the stone though, and is keen to dispel this myth.

Opals are also quite soft and are not really suitable for everyday wear, unlike very hard stones such as diamond. It’s possible that the bad luck attributed to the stones is simply down to their fragile nature – for example, they can chip easily when worn in a ring. Diamonds, by contrast, especially colorless ones, have historically been considered good luck.

What’s your birthstone?

January: garnet

February: amethyst

March: bloodstone, aquamarine (alternative)

April: diamond, rock crystal (alt)

May: emerald, chrysoprase (alt)

June: pearl, moonstone (alt)

July: ruby, cornelian (alt)

August: peridot, sardonyx (alt)

September: sapphire, lapis lazuli (alt)

October: opal

November: yellow topaz, citrine (alt)

December: turquoise, tanzanite (alt)

Whether you’re looking for a unique engagement ring with a specific birthstone for your bride-to-be or a traditional fine diamond ring, visit Adina by Empire Jeweler’s extensive eBay store. With a 100% customer satisfaction rating and prices way below retail, you’ll have a buying experience beyond compare!

Source: https://www.whowhatwear.com/birthstone-engagement-ring-trend

New Trend of Women Proposing to Men

Olympic gold medalist Lindsey Vonn recently proposed to her now fiancé, New Jersey Devils star P.K. Subban. Vonn is one of a growing number of women taking their relationships into their own hands and asking their significant other to marry them.

If you’re considering proposing, here’s some things to keep in mind and why you’re in good company. Information courtesy of The Washington Post.

No shame in the game

“We talk about equality but actions speak louder than words,” Vonn said. “Men should get engagement rings too and this is what P.K. deserves.” Vonn showed a close-up of Subban’s new engagement ring on her Twitter page with this message: 

@lindseyvonn

Merry Christmas and happy holidays everyone!! On our 2 year anniversary, in a “non traditional” move, I asked P.K. to marry me and he said, Yes ! Women aren’t the only ones who should get engagement rings! #MerryChristmas #equality

Vonn is now in a rare category of women who have proposed to men. Judge Judy Sheindlin popped the question to her second husband in 1978; socialite Zsa Zsa Gabor claimed to have proposed to all nine of her husbands and Queen Victoria proposed to her cousin, Prince Albert, in 1839. Diane Von Furstenberg proposed to her current husband, Barry Diller; and Elizabeth Taylor, who was married a total of eight times to seven husbands, proposed to her second husband, British actor Michael Wilding. Pop star Pink proposed to her hubby, motocross champion Carey Hart, back in June 2005 — while he was mid-race! Kristen Bell proposed to hubby Dax Shepard on Twitter as soon as the Defense of Marriage Act was struck down in 2013.

About seven percent of couples opt for dual proposals, according to The Knot’s 2019 Jewelry & Engagement Study. The wedding-planning site’s executive editor, Lauren Kay, told The Atlantic that 97 percent of grooms in heterosexual relationships report proposing to their brides.

Only about a third of all marriage proposals in the United States are actually a surprise, according to The Knot.

Floating on air

Last September, Mollie Bloudoff-Indelicato came up with an out-of-this-world way to propose to her boyfriend Greg Linch—on a weightless flight out of Dulles International Airport, according to The Washington Post.

“We were on a zero-gravity flight, hurtling through the sky, our bodies suspended in air. Taking aim, I floated a small blue box over to Greg. He made a heroic dive, the kind of move you’d see in a Netflix rom-com, and caught it,” Bloudoff-Indelicato explains. When he opened it, the ring levitated upward. “It was the perfect proposal for us, combining our passion for science with our love of adventure.”

Why the disparity?

Why isn’t it more common in our society for women to propose to men? Perhaps because gender stereotypes paint men as less willing to commit, they’re traditionally the ones to drive heterosexual relationships forward — and that includes popping the question.

“Even though we’ve seen a lot of gender role change in society, the marriage proposal has remained pretty static compared to all these other domains,” says Rachael Robnett, an associate professor of psychology at the University of Nevada at Las Vegas.

“We tend to think of proposals as romantic and special occasions, but the history behind them is much more legalistic and formal,” says Katherine Parkin, a professor of history at Monmouth University in New Jersey.

“Men get down on one knee to demonstrate the chivalry of their intentions and provide a diamond ring as proof that they can care for their partner financially. Because men have historically made more money than women, it tracked that they would be the ones to propose.”

Pat Summersall popped the question to her now-husband more than 30 years ago. The 63-year-old copy shop co-owner in Harrogate, Britain, says they had only been dating for six months, but she knew what she wanted in a husband and her boyfriend was it. Still, “it was more difficult for women of my age [to propose],” she says, “because we didn’t have job equality growing up, we didn’t have financial equality.”

“I have income at my disposal, so I can afford to buy my partner a ring. Yet many of my girlfriends make decent livings, and they haven’t proposed.”

So what’s stopping today’s financially stable women from popping the question? If you’re sure your partner is the one, follow your instincts and be inspired by the strong and sassy women who have done it already!

If you’re looking for a GIA-certified diamond for you special someone, make sure to visit Empire’s eBay store for an incredible selection of hundreds of high-quality new and estate diamond rings at up to 70 percent off what you would pay at retail. With 100% positive feedback and satisfaction guaranteed, you’ll get a buying experience beyond your expectations!

Sources: The Washington Post and The Washington Post

Spring 2019 Bridal Jewelry Trends

A bride’s gown is clearly the most important piece when it comes to her wedding day style. However, the jewelry and accessories are close runners-up, because they tie her dream ensemble together. While the perfect pair of shoes is a must, jewelry choices are also of utmost importance (especially the wedding bands, since they will be worn daily).

With all the choices available, here’s a look at the jewelry trends dominating the runways this spring, courtesy of Amanda Hennigan at premierbride.com.

Colored stones making a comeback

According to Premier Bride, colored stones are increasing in popularity as a choice for engagement rings, including rubies, sapphires, emeralds or colored diamonds. They’re becoming increasingly popular in wedding bands as well, being used by brides as a way to bring eye-catching color to their ring set.

Partners are also choosing to experiment with stackable rings as an alternative to the traditional wedding ring set. These rings can bring color, texture, and even mixed metals to the set. This trend is a great way to play with different looks and get a feel for what works best with your existing rings.

Drop statement earrings

What adorns the ears plays a big part in wedding jewelry. Hairstyles can either hide or accentuate earrings, but for brides with pierced ears, they often are used to tie together the entire ensemble.

Trending for 2019 are drop statement earrings, encrusted with diamonds and other stones. This style complements traditional, sleek partial or full updos, and is perfect for the bride looking to add a dramatic accent to her bridal attire.

Statement necklace pieces

Depending on the neckline of the gown, necklaces can be statement pieces or understated additions to the overall look. With this year’s trend of statement earrings, necklaces are taking a back seat, encouraging simple and delicate, yet elegant pieces.

Layered necklaces create a similar effect to stacked rings. They add color and texture, while accenting the bride’s décolletage. Designers are even incorporating that mixed metal trend that we’re seeing, while keeping the pieces simple.

Choker necklaces, which have been making a comeback for the last few years, are being seen with an addition of a long end that’ll work with most necklines on bridal gowns.

Whether you want to style your wedding look with this spring’s bridal jewelry trends, or have your own unique style, shop for your wedding jewelry at Adina By Empire’s eBay store. With a wide variety estate, vintage and antique jewelry, plus a huge assortment of wedding bands and engagement rings, you’ll find perfect wedding jewelry at true wholesale prices and a shopping experience beyond compare.

Top Six Steps to Picking the Perfect Engagement Ring

Selecting an engagement ring for your future spouse can be one of the most daunting tasks a romantic can undertake. You’ve found the “one” to be your life partner and want to find the “perfect” ring he or she will love and want to show off to friends and family.

There are many choices, but fear not, we’ve put together six steps to finding the perfect engagement ring for your future spouse, courtesy of the GIA.

  1. Make it a surprise. While the trend of couples shopping together for an engagement ring is on the rise, we suggest you try to figure out what he or she will like on your own. Yes, it will take some detective work, but if you get it right, the reward will pay dividends. There are few opportunities for a really big surprise in life—let your engagement ring be one of them.
  2. Decide on and stick to your budget. Like any major purchase, decide on what you can comfortably afford, and stick to it. Then do your due diligence so you can save money. Spending more than you have to won’t make the ring any nicer than it is. In fact, getting a good deal may endear you even more to your future spouse. Rather than expensive retail jewelry stores in malls (remember, you’re paying higher mark ups), consider visiting a high-end pawn shop like Empire Jewelers for beautiful and unique pieces at a fraction of the cost.
  3. Pay attention to what they wear. You could ask one of their close friends for advice on the kind of ring he or she would like, but you run the risk of them talking and ruining the surprise. We suggest putting on your detective hat and paying attention to what your SO is wearing from day to day.Are the rings and other pieces classic and traditional or funky and modern? Are they full of bling or more subdued? If you buy something similar to what he or she already likes, you’ll probably choose the right one.
  4. Know their ring size. This is an important one, because you’ll want to know the ring will fit when you present it. If he or she wears rings, borrow one they already own. Trace the inner circle on a piece of paper, or press the ring into a bar of soap for an impression. You can also slide it down one of your own fingers and draw a line where it stops. A jeweler can use these measurements to identify his or her approximate ring size.
  5. Know what diamond shape suits him or her. After determining the style and ring size, you’ll need to pick a design. As your future spouse will be wearing this ring every day during his or her engagement and into your married life, it really needs to fit their personality. To help you decide, here are some popular engagement ring designs to consider for him or her:
  • Engagement ring designs for women:
  • Solitaire – Featuring a single stone, this is the most popular choice in engagement rings. Solitaires can be set with four prongs or six prongs. A four-prong-setting shows more of the diamond, but a six-prong setting is often more secure.
  • Side stones – Diamonds or other gemstones, flank the main stone for additional sparkle or color. Popular side-stone settings include ”channel,” which protects stones by keeping them flush, and ”bar channel” which allows more light to enter the sides tones.
  • Three Stone – One diamond for the past, one for the present, and one for the future. Typically, the center diamond is larger than the two side stones.
  • Pavé (pah-vey) – The main stone is surrounded by tiny diamonds to add sparkle and the illusion of greater size.
  • Engagement ring designs for men:
  • In addition to traditional gold and platinum, men’s engagement and wedding rings come in an array of unique, modern metals. Select from titanium, zirconium, tungsten carbide, and steel. Even natural materials, such as wood are becoming increasingly popular. Men may also choose a ring that’s accented with stones such as black diamonds for added brilliance and intrigue. Plain bands featuring textural elements such as a woven or hammered design are also quite popular.

6. Create an experience. Once you’ve made the effort and decided on the ring you think your loved one will truly cherish, create a proposal experience that’s unique to your relationship. Whether together you enjoy sports, horseback riding, taking in shows or have a favorite romantic hiking spot, create one of the fondest experiences you can and make a memory to last your lifetime together.

If you’re looking for a fine diamond engagement ring, make sure to visit Empire’s eBay store for an incredible selection of hundreds of high-quality new and estate diamond rings at up to 70 percent off what you would pay at retail.

Source: GIA

Meghan Markle’s Ring and the Return of Yellow Gold

Meghan Markle's Ring Yellow Gold

Meghan Markle’s Ring and the Return of Yellow Gold

On November 27, Prince Harry and Meghan Markle stood together hand-in-hand in the Sunken Gardens at Kensington Palace in London, England, and announced their engagement to the world. For Royal watchers and jewelry fans, it was the first glimpse of the stunning engagement ring designed by Prince Harry and created by Cleave & Company, Court Jewelers and medalists to her majesty, The Queen.

Ring being deemed priceless

Markle’s engagement ring features three white diamonds: a large center diamond, flanked by two smaller diamonds set in a yellow gold band. The stones were specially selected by the Prince—the central diamond is from Botswana, where the couple recently holidayed together, and the other two diamonds are from his late mother, Princess Diana’s, personal collection.

According to diamond experts, a ring similar to Markle’s could retail between $300,000 to $350,000 if it were made of diamonds of the highest quality, or it could go for around a 10th of the price at $35,000 to $40,000 if the diamonds were of a poorer quality. However, Markle’s particular ring is being deemed priceless because of Prince Harry’s decision to include two diamonds that belonged to the late Princess Diana.

“There is no way for anyone to put a value on the whole ring,” said one expert. “Having diamonds from the royal collection that Princess Diana wore makes the ring priceless.”

In a press conference, Prince Harry explained that he wanted his late mother, who passed away 20 years ago this year, to be a part of the celebration, which is why he used diamonds from her personal collection of jewels to give to Meghan. “The little diamonds on either side are from my mother’s jewelry collection to make sure that she’s with us on this – on this crazy journey together.”

Is yellow gold coming back?

Prince Harry also said that the ring is yellow gold because it is Markle’s favorite. Is her ring and the Royal engagement helping to make yellow gold engagement rings popular? For the most part, yellow gold has never been that unpopular. For centuries, yellow gold has been considered the ultimate in luxury, going back to the ancient Egyptians. In the past decade, however, white metals — gold and platinum — have been the popular choice.

Whether or not yellow gold is the current trend, when selecting your engagement ring, it’s important to base your decision on what you personally prefer. If you can’t decide, experts suggest that yellow gold typically complements warmer skin tones, while white complements cool skin tones. Wondering what other A-listers chose yellow gold for their engagement ring? Actresses Halle Berry, Jennifer Aniston and Olivia Wilde all opted for a yellow gold engagement ring in recent years.

Understanding yellow gold

Pure yellow gold is actually a very soft metal, so in order to be used and worn as jewelry, it is necessary to mix it with another type metal – normally copper, silver, nickel, or zinc. If just pure yellow gold were used, the ring would soon be dented and misshapen.

The higher the karat—the amount of yellow gold—used in the metal, the warmer the yellow tone and the higher the price. Pure yellow gold is 24 karat, while most engagement rings are either 18k (75% gold and 25% alloy metal) or 14k gold (58% gold and 42% alloy metal).

For those on a budget, yellow gold can be a good choice, as it offers more flexibility when it comes to the color of the diamond you choose. Because your solitaire stone is not being placed next to a white metal, where it may compare unfavorably, it matters less if the color of the diamond you choose is down the lower end of the scale. Several designer engagement ring brands create some truly breathtaking pieces using yellow gold and many relish the opportunity to design something that has a vintage aesthetic.

Sources: Hello! Magazine, Inquisitr.com, Whiteflash.com

If you’re interested in purchasing an engagement ring, visit Adina Jeweler’s online eBay store where you’ll find GIA certified diamonds, and new and estate engagement rings at true wholesale prices.

What to Know Before Buying a Diamond Engagement Ring

Planning on buying a diamond engagement ring? This can be an intimidating task if you don’t know how diamonds are rated and valued. Here’s a review of the 4Cs—cut, color, clarity and carat—as well as some other diamond buying tips to help you feel confident when you browse and buy.

The GIA Diamond Rating System, aka the 4Cs

In the 1940s, the Gemological Institute of America (GIA) created a universal rating system to standardize the diamond rating process, and ultimately protect consumers from getting ripped off.

Known as “the 4Cs,” the GIA International Diamond Grading System™ is the jewelry industry standard to objectively evaluate, compare, and rate diamonds.

Carat—the standard unit of weight. The word carat derives from carob seeds because early gemstone appraisers used carob seeds as counterweights on their scales.

One carat weighs 0.2 grams, and one carat is equal to 100 points. Therefore, a quarter carat weighs 25 points, a half carat weighs 50 points and a three-quarter carat weighs 75 points. It takes about 142 carats to equal one ounce.

A fraction of a carat can mean a big difference in the value of a diamond, so precision in measuring is crucial. Carat weight is often measured to the hundred thousandths of a carat, and rounded to a hundredth of a carat.

Note: Diamond carat should not be confused with gold karat, which refers to gold purity.

Color—colorless is more valuable. Diamonds are valued by how closely they approach colorlessness: the less color a diamond has, the higher its value. The exception to this rule are the rare colored diamonds—known as “fancy” colored diamonds—which are growing in popularity. Most diamonds sold in retail stores are near colorless to faint or light brown or yellow.

The Gemological Institute of America’s universal color scale starts at D, representing colorless, and goes through Z and beyond to the fancy and vivid colors. The higher the letter, the more presence of color in the diamond.

Clarity—a diamond’s internal and external flaws. Blemishes are external flaws, and inclusions are internal flaws. Inclusions are created when the diamond is formed, or when the diamond is cut. Because 100 percent “perfect” diamonds are very rare in nature, those with fewer blemishes and inclusions are rarer and cost more.

The GIA International Diamond Grading System™ Clarity Scale is the standard clarity grade scale, and contains 11 grades. Diamonds are assigned a clarity grade ranging from flawless (FL) to diamonds with obvious inclusions (I3). Most diamonds are graded in the VS (very slightly included) or SI (slightly included) categories.

To determine a diamond’s clarity, appraisers using the GIA Clarity Scale consider different variables, including the diamond’s size, nature, position, color or relief, and quantity of clarity characteristics visible under 10X magnification.

Cut—rates characteristics of shape. The GIA system rates a diamond’s cut using five grades: Excellent, Very Good, Good, Fair, and Poor. The system considers factors such as brightness, fire and scintillation, weight ratio, durability, polish, and symmetry.

The cut of any diamond has three attributes: brilliance (the total light reflected from a diamond), fire (the dispersion of light into the colors of the spectrum), and scintillation (the flashes of light, or sparkle, when a diamond is moved).

Most diamond jewelry uses the standard round brilliant shape. All others are known as fancy shapes, and include the marquise, pear, oval, and emerald cuts. Diamond shapes such as hearts and triangles are also gaining in popularity.

Other Important Diamond Buying Tips

Understanding the cut, color, clarity, and carat of a diamond is important, but when it comes down to it, choosing the right diamond is also subjective: how you feel and what you like. Don’t just focus on the GIA rating—go with a diamond that looks beautiful to you—or better yet, your mate will appreciate—and is in your budget. Make sure you know the person’s taste and ring size, as well as the jewelry store’s return policy.

If you’re looking to buy a diamond engagement ring, but don’t want to pay retail prices, visit Adina’s eBay store. You’ll find fine a vast selection of fine certified diamonds and get a buying experience that’s above your expectations from where the reliable diamond experts at Adina Jewelers.

 
 
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